The Party is Over av Tom Sunic

Tom SunicThe Occidental Observer: Morphine is said to be good for people subject to severe depressions, or even pessimism. Although the drug first surfaced in a laboratory at the end of the 19th century, its basis, opium, had been used earlier by many aristocratic and revolutionary nationalist thinkers. A young and secretive German romantic, Novalis, enjoyed eating and smoking opium juice, probably because he had always yearned to alleviate his nostalgia for death. Probably in order to write his poem Sehnsucht nach dem Tode (“Nostalgia of Death”). Early poets of Romanticism turned inward to their irrational feelings, shrouding themselves in the pensive loneliness which opiates endlessly offer.

Revolutionary-Conservative, Anarcho–Nationalist Aesthetics
Once upon a distant time we met Homer’s Odysseus, who was frequently nagged by the childish behavior of his pesky sailors. Somewhere along the shores of northern Africa, Odysseus had strayed away into the mythical land of the lotus flower. As soon as his sailors began to eat the lotus plant, they sank into forgetfulness, and immediately forgot their history and their homeland. It was with great pain that Odysseus succeeded in extracting them from artificial paradises. What can be worse for White race or than to erase its past and lose its collective memory?

The escape from industrial reality and the maddening crowd was one of the main motives for drug use among some revolutionary conservative poets and thinkers, who could not face the onset of liberal mass society. The advent of early liberalism and socialism was accompanied not only by factory chimneys, but also by loneliness, decay, and decadence. The young English Tory Thomas De Quincey, in his essay Confessions of an English Opium Eater, relates his Soho escapades with a poor prostitute Anna, as well as his spiritual journeys in the aftertaste of opium. De Quincey has a feeling that one life-minute lasts a century, finally putting an end to the reckless flow of time.

The mystique of opium was also grasped by the mid-19th-century French symbolist and greatest poet of all time, Charles Baudelaire. He continued the aristo-nihilistic-revolutionary-conservative tradition of dope indulgence via the water pipe, i.e., the Pakistani hookah. Similar to the lonely albatross, Baudelaire observes the decaying France in which the steamroller of coming liberalism mercilessly crushes all aesthetics and all poetics.

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